In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
April 14, 2015

Even as nursing homes are busily investing in luxury living quarters, the quality of care is strikingly uneven. And it is clear that many of the homes are not up to the challenge of providing the intensive medical care that rehabilitation requires. David Grabowski, professor of health care policy, is quoted. 

April 14, 2015

The state of California is launching a US$3-million precision-medicine project. The effort will draw on vast amounts of data from basic research, medical records and other information to develop more-targeted therapies and diagnostics and inform decisions about individual patient care. Isaac Kohane, co-director of the Center for Biomedical Informatics and Lawrence J. Henderson Professor of Pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, is quoted.

April 13, 2015

A recent study has found that Massachusetts health care reform didn’t completely eliminate the barriers people experienced to receiving care, showing that although more people had health insurance, preventable hospitalizations stayed high. Danny McCormick, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School, associate professor of medicine at Cambridge Health Alliance, is the study’s lead author.

April 13, 2015

Some people feel better after placebo treatments, while others feel no difference unless the drugs are real. A new paper argues that the difference may come down to genetics. Kathryn Hall, research fellow in medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, is the paper’s lead author

April 13, 2015

A selfie might save your life. The camera on your phone could be used to test for cervical cancer and HPV, a virus that can lead to the disease.  Ralph Weissleder Thrall Family Professor of Radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, led the research team. Cesar Castro, instructor in medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, a member of the research team, is quoted.

April 13, 2015

There's no question mammograms can save lives by detecting breast cancer early. But they can also result in unnecessary testing and treatment that can be alarming and costly. In fact, each year the U.S. spends $4 billion on follow-up tests and treatments that result from inaccurate mammograms, scientists report in a new study. Kenneth Mandl, professor of pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, led the study. 

April 10, 2015

Pieter Cohen, assistant professor of medicine at Cambridge Health Alliance, participated in an interview about the health risks of some dietary supplements, and whether the industry and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are doing enough to protect consumers.

April 10, 2015

Continued coverage of the New England Primate Research Center.

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