In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
July 16, 2013

American children may be in the midst of a blood pressure problem. A new study from the American Heart Association shows that over the past 13 years, children and adolescents have seen stark rises in their risk for high blood pressure. Bernard Rosner, HMS professor of medicine (biostatistics) at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is the lead author.

July 16, 2013

From madness to seizures, to crime and lack of sleep, people have long blamed the full moon for a range of problems. Research, on the other hand, has found little evidence over the years to support these anecdotal accounts of the moon's powers over the human body and brain. Frank Scheer, HMS assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, is quoted.

July 15, 2013

For women, an aspirin every other day may keep colon cancer away, a new study suggests. Nancy Cook, HMS professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is the lead author of the study.

July 15, 2013

Paul Farmer, the Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine and chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at HMS, participated in a Q&A with The New Times in Rwanda.

July 15, 2013

The Boston Globe published an editorial about a growing pool of evidence that eating disorders are affecting more men every year. Jerel Calzo, HMS instructor in pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital, is quoted.

July 15, 2013

They are both miserable diseases, but a sweeping study from Boston scientists finds that people who develop cancer appear to have a significantly reduced risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease—especially those treated with chemotherapy. Jane Driver, HMS assistant professor of medicine at VA Boston Healthcare System, is the study’s lead researcher. Laura Frain, HMS research fellow in medicine, is a co-researcher. Gad Marshall, HMS assistant professor of neurology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is quoted.

July 15, 2013

Scientists who used adult stem cells to create functional and long-lasting blood vessels in mice say this research could lead to new treatments for cardiovascular disease. Rakesh Jain, the A. Werk Cook Professor of Radiation Oncology (Tumor Biology) at Massachusetts General Hospital, is a study co-senior author.

July 15, 2013

A growing body of evidence suggests that a “trained” brain will be better equipped to work around damage caused by disease, injury, deficits, or aging — just as a physically fit person can better avoid and bounce back from injury. Bonnie Wong, HMS instructor in neurology; Alvaro Pascual-Leone, HMS professor of neurology; and Mo Shafi, HMS instructor in neurology, are leading the Brain Fit Club at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

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