In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
May 4, 2015

A personalized method for interpreting blood tests identifies more ovarian cancer cases than a generalized approach, a new study suggests. Steven Skates, associate professor of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is a coauthor of the research.

May 4, 2015

When 911 dispatchers get a call that someone has collapsed and stopped breathing, they quickly notify first responders. In hundreds of communities across the country, they also send out alerts via smartphone, summoning everyday citizens who have been trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Carlos Camargo, professor of emergency medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted.

May 4, 2015

Editing the genetic material of human embryos was a first — and the April 18 publication of the results set off a cascade of awe and controversy. George Daley, professor of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology, is quoted.

May 4, 2015

Harvey Makadon, professor of medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, authored this article about health care for LGBT people and those living with HIV.

May 3, 2015

So when a Chinese team revealed last month that it had used a new laboratory technique to alter a gene in human embryos, it set off an urgent debate over the ethics — and wisdom — of tinkering with the most basic building blocks of life. George Church, Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, is quoted.

May 3, 2015

A gene therapy that helped restore sight in patients with a rare form of childhood blindness appears to wane with time, a sign the cutting-edge field may not be able to cure some ailments with a single course of treatment. Eric A. Pierce, Solman and Libe Friedman Associate Professor of Ophthalmology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, is quoted.

May 2, 2015

James Recht, assistant professor of psychiatry at Cambridge Health Alliance, authored this letter to the editor about university campaigns for “sustainable investments” vs. divestment from companies that mine fossil fuels

May 2, 2015

One thing that is known about the placebo effect is that it involves several brain systems, each under the control of a particular type of messenger molecule, called a neurotransmitter. These systems, like everything else in the body, are regulated by genes. This has led some researchers to ask whether different versions of the genes in question might modulate a person’s susceptibility to placebos. Kathryn Hall, research fellow in medicine Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, led the research.

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