Manual DHCP Requests

HMS Information Technology

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Manual DHCP Request Instructions

Information on this page provides details and instructions needed to complete the HMS Manual DHCP Request Form. A manual IP address is needed for any shared network device, such as a printer or a file server, that requires a consistent network address.

To complete the Manual DHCP Request Form you need to supply:

MAC address

A MAC (Media Access Control) address is a unique identifier for all networked hardware. Both wired devices such as computers and printers have MAC addresses as do wireless devices such as laptops and "smart" phones.

To locate the MAC address on a Macintosh:

  1. Choose Apple, System Preferences... from the Finder menu.
  2. Under Internet & Wireless, click Network.
  3. If you don't see an Ethernet ID, click Advanced... and then click Ethernet.
  4. The MAC Address/Ethernet ID is a 12-digit character string which includes both numbers and letters. Example: 00:15:4b:bd:ef:3a

You can write this number down or select and copy it to paste it into the manual DHCP request form.

To locate the MAC address in Windows:

  1. Click Start and Select (Windows XP) or Type Run (Windows 7) and press Enter.
  2. Type cmd and press Enter.
  3. Type ipconfig/all and press Enter.
  4. The MAC Address is listed as the Physical Address and displays as a 12-digit character string which includes both numbers and letters. Example: 00:15:4b:bd:ef:3a

To locate the MAC address of a Printer:

You can review your printer's manual to find how to locate the MAC address for your printer. Alternatively you can print the configuration page for your printer which will include the MAC address. It may be listed as "Hardware Address".

If in doubt, please contact your Departmental Client Services Representative for assistance.

An IP Address

An IP (Internet Protocol) address is similar to a street address; both identify a specific point in an area with many locations. IP addresses are made up of four connected numbers of up to 3 digits each, e.g.: 10.11.999.7. Each successive number narrows down your location on the network and each device on the network needs to have a unique IP address.

To locate the IP address on a Macintosh:

  1. Make sure your computer is connected to a network jack and wireless connectivity is disabled.
  2. Choose Apple, System Preferences... from the Finder menu.
  3. Under Internet & Wireless, click Network.
  4. Your IP address is set of four connected numbers, up to 3 digits each. Example: 134.174.16.2.

To locate the IP address in Windows:

  1. Make sure your computer is connected to a network jack and wireless connectivity is disabled.
  2. Click Start and Select (Windows XP) or Type Run (Windows 7) and press Enter.
  3. Type cmd and press Enter.
  4. Type ipconfig/all and press Enter.
  5. The IP Address is set of four connected numbers, up to 3 digits each. Example: 134.174.16.2. It is located under the Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection section.

To locate the IP address of a Printer:

You can review your printer's manual to check to see how to locate the IP address for your printer. Alternatively you can print the configuration page for your printer which will include the IP address.

A Host Name

IP addresses can uniquely identify any device that connects to a network, but aren't very "user friendly". Instead, we typically use a Fully Qualified Domain Name (FQDN). A FQDN names let you connect to locations such as "hms.harvard.edu" or "www.google.com" rather than having to type in a long string of numbers. An intermediary server, called the Domain Name Server (or Service) - a DNS, translates the names into numbers.

When requesting a manual DHCP you'll need to supply a Host name for the device. A Host name is a unique word or character string at the beginning of a FQDN. For example, at the Medical School we use med.harvard.edu as a web domain name. The FQDN it.med.harvard.edu, Information Technology's web site, is different from pme.med.harvard.edu, the Program in Medical Education's web site. The host name you select should reflect the server, service or printer, and of course, be unique. A domain name will be added to the host name you supply. Most often "med.harvard.edu" is appended, but the domain name may vary depending on your school or department.

Finally, although HMS does not have strict naming conventions, the host name you supply will need to conform to DNS naming standards:

  • The label can be up to 63 characters in length, but keeping it short and simple is best. Also keep in mind that a domain name will be added to the end of the name you provide.
  • The label name must be unique. If you have two laser jet printers in your office, they cannot both be called it-laserjet.med.harvard.edu.
  • Include only letters, numbers and the dash "-". No other symbols are allowed.
  • Label names are case insensitive and will always display in lower case.

Sample names:

  • it-lj8100-vandy105.med.harvard.edu
  • smith-lab.med.harvard.edu

For questions or additional assistance, please contact your Departmental Client Services Representative.