Faculty Development

More... Share to Twitter Share to Facebook
Faculty Development

Past Faculty Development 


Foundational Continuity Clinic (FCC)/ Primary Care Clerkship (PCC)
Summer Faculty Retreat  (Invite Only)
Friday, September 16, 2016 7:30-1:00PM

Target Audience
Preceptors for the Foundational Continuity Clinic (FCC) and the Primary Care Clerkship (PCC)  

Course Planner
Susan Frankl, MD
Becky Cunningham, MD 

Preceptors for the Foundational Continuity Clinic (FCC) and the Primary Care Clerkship (PCC) will come together for a joint half day retreat to learn about their role in the evolving state of primary care education in the HMS Pathways Curriculum. Preceptors will hear about lessons learned from the first year of the new curriculum and how both courses will evolve in the coming year based on this feedback. In addition, faculty will have an opportunity to become familiar with Canvas and Oasis our new educational technology platforms. Nancy Oriol, M.D., HMS Dean for Students will be our guest keynote speaker on the topic of Culture, Climate and Our Community: The Intersection of the generations and its Impact on Medical Education. The morning will include interactive workshops designed to provide you with key skills to enhance your work as a teacher in the primary care office setting. You will have an opportunity to share your own experiences and get to know your fellow preceptors. 

Click here for video of the intro of this event   


Program Schedule

7:30-8:00 Registration and Continental Breakfast 
8:00-9:00

Welcome and Introduction
Edward Hundert, MD
Dean for Medical Education, Harvard Medical School 

Curriculum Updates and Technology Primer
Susan Frankl, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Becky Cunningham, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Barbara Cockrill, MD
Harold Amos Academy Associates Professor, Brigham and Women's Hospital
Sally Bartlett, EdM
Clerkship Manager, Harvard Medical School  

9:00-9:45

Keynote Address: Culture, Climate, and our Community: The Intersection of the Generations
Nancy Oriol, MD
Faculty Associate Dean for Community Engagement in Medical Education, Harvard Medical School 

There are 4 generations practicing medicine today. Who are they, who defines them, and why does it matter? Everyone says that generations differ; is this true, and what would make generations differ? At anyone moment in time generations seem to have somewhat differing cultural norms and values. As we each consider our own culture as "normal," we may cause others to experience us as biased and judgmental. Such experiences and perceptions affect education in medicine. In this session, we will consider education and professional development through multiple lenses: culture, the way of life of a group of people determined by their common values; climate, what people feel within a prevailing culture; and the community of physicians in the workforce today arising from 4 different generationally-determined cultures. How shall we all get along? How can we learn to harness these forces to propel progress in medical education and practice?

9:45-10:00 Coffee Break 

10:00-10:55 & 
11:00-11:55

Interactive Teaching Skills Workshops Sessions I & II (options will repeat)

Option 1: Teaching Motivational Interviewing (Only Available During Workshop Session II)

Barbara Ogur, MD
Associate Professor of Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance
Joji Suzuki, MD
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital 

Engaging patients to actively participate in achieving their healthcare goals is a challenging skill to teach. In this workshop participants will review the basics of motivational interviewing and learn how to meaningfully engage medical students in counseling patients regarding adoption of lifestyle changes to improve health and well-being

Option 2: The Art of Asking Questions

Richard Schwartzstein, MD
Ellen and Melvin Gordon Professor of Medical Education, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
 
Given the fast pace of a busy primary care clinic, it is challenging to engage students in meaningful discourse to promote their clinical reasoning skills.  In this workshop participants will learn how questions can improve learning and how to use questions to maximize student engagement and promote critical thinking skills. This workshop is a repeat of the session presented at the Winter 2016 PCC faculty meeting.

Resources: (Please note: In order to view the resources below, you must be logged into eCommons in a separate tab in the same browser window in order to view).
Article 1Article 2Article 3

 
Option 3: Teaching Students to Quickly Find Evidence-based Answers to Clinical Questions in a Busy Clinic

Kristen Goodell, MD
Director for Innovation in Medical Education, Center for Primary Care, Harvard Medical School
Paul Bain, PhD
Reference & Education Librarian, Countway Library of Medicine, Harvard Medical School 

Given the wide breath of medical knowledge needed to care for patients in a primary care setting, the skills to identify the most current, and applicable evidence-based answers to clinical questions is of extreme importance. In this workshop, Participants will learn how to effectively use some of the best resources available to teach students to find quick evidence-based answers to clinical questions in real time.

Option 4: Effective Formative Feedback and Ensuring Student Progress 

Katherine Johnston, MD
Instructor in Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
Cynthia Cooper, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital

In the HMS Pathways curriculum, we uniquely have the advantage of teaching medical students longitudinally over many months to years. However, with this opportunity, we have the challenge to ensure that students continue to learn and progress in their clinical skills throughout their time with us. In this workshop, participants will practice providing meaningful formative feedback to students and learn ways to monitor and document the development of clinical skills overtime.

Resources: (Please note: In order to view the resources below, you must be logged into eCommons in a separate tab in the same browser window in order to view).
Article 1 

Option 5: Progressive Student Autonomy and Responsibility: Balancing Patient Needs with Student Education

Leigh Simmons, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital

As primary care physicians we have the responsibility to provide outstanding medical care to our patients in a time efficient manner. At the same time, we also have the task of meeting with the learning needs of our students. In this workshop, participants will explore teaching methods to provide medical students with meaningful clinical experiences with appropriately graded increases in level of independence, all while maintaining the highest levels of patient-centered care.

Resources: (Please note: In order to view the resources below, you must be logged into eCommons in a separate tab in the same browser window in order to view).
Article 1Article 2Article 3

12:00-1:00 Lunch (Breakout groups by site)
Meet with your FCC and PCC site directors and preceptors to share best practices, review student progress, and site-specific logistics.  
   

 


 

Our

Mission

Our Mission

To create and nurture a diverse community of the best people committed to leadership in alleviating human suffering caused by disease