In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
May 29, 2015

Continued coverage of the New England Primate Research Center closing.

May 29, 2015

For decades, researchers understood little about IBD, which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. But the new swell in Chinese cases offers researchers “an opportunity that is unparalleled” to understand what causes the disease and how it might ultimately be treated or prevented. Gail Cassell, senior lecturer on global health and social medicine, is quoted.

May 29, 2015

Genome sequencing can answer decades-old health questions for some, but testing seemingly healthy people can produce ambiguous results that raise more questions than they answer. Richard Haspel, assistant professor of pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Robert Green, associate professor medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, are quoted.

May 28, 2015

Top scientists are sounding the alarm over human gene-editing — now moving from the realm of science fiction into real labs — and they’re calling for an emergency summit on the medical technology that holds promise for people with deadly genetic diseases, but has raised fears. George Church, Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, is quoted.

May 28, 2015

Pregnant women often fear taking the antidepressants they rely on. But not treating their mental illness can be just as dangerous. Lee Cohen, Edmund N. and Carroll M. Carpenter Professor of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted. 

May 28, 2015

Five families have come to Children’s Hospital researchers for help diagnosing yet-to-be-identified diseases, and scientists are hoping clues to potential cures lie in genetics.Alan Beggs, Sir Edwin and Lady Manton Professor of Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital; and Isaac Kohane, inaugural chair of the Department of Biomedical Informatics at Harvard Medical School and Lawrence J. Henderson Professor of Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital, are quoted. 

May 28, 2015

Jean Fain, teaching associate in psychiatry at Cambridge Health Alliance, writes about the downside of diets and talked with University of Minnesota Psychology Professor Traci Mann about why diets don't work.

May 27, 2015

Genetic tests for breast cancer risk often look for DNA flaws that haven’t been reliably linked to the disease, a new report found, casting doubt on diagnostics that examine dozens of genes to calculate a patient’s susceptibility. Heidi Rehm, associate professor of pathology at Brigham and Women's Hospital, is mentioned.

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