In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
April 24, 2015

When people come out as transgender — especially if they choose to transition medically — one of the most common questions they face is how it affects whom they are attracted to and whom they love. The fact is—for many transgender people—it simply doesn’t. Norman Spack, associate professor of pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, is quoted.

April 24, 2015

Four thousand years after the woolly mammoth vanished from the Earth, scientists have deciphered the genetic blueprint that may offer a key to bringing it back. George Church, Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, led the research.

April 24, 2015

Brain scans showed that seniors exposed to higher levels of the kind of small particle pollution that can come from car exhaust had a higher risk of mini-strokes and a smaller brain volume compared to those living in less-polluted areas, according to a new study. Elissa Wilker, instructor in medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, led the study.

April 23, 2015

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned five companies to stop selling dietary supplements containing an unapproved stimulant known as beta-methylphenylethylamine, or BMPEA. Pieter Cohen, assistant professor of medicine at Cambridge Health Alliance, is quoted.

April 23, 2015

David King, assistant professor of surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, participated in an interview about his experiences treating the wounded after running the Boston Marathon in 2013.

April 23, 2015

Mohammed Milad, associate professor of psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, is interviewed about his research on an intriguing hormone-based hypothesis that might help explain why so many more women suffer from fear and anxiety disorders than men.

April 23, 2015

Breakfast is an important meal for cultivating good health, but a handful of recent studies seem to be building a case for it ranking as perhaps the most critical meal for fifty- and sixty-something eaters, particularly when it comes to preventing and managing diabetes. Frank Scheer, assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is quoted.

April 23, 2015

The potential of the internal gyroscopes, accelerometers, and GPS sensors in Apple's mobile devices may help patients, doctors, and researchers track the progression of conditions like heart disease, Parkinson’s, and asthma. Stanley Shaw, assistant professor of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted.

Pages

Resources

Submit Photo Requests to HMS
To request photos from the HMS Office of Communications and External Relations, click here.

 

Tell us about your awards
Share news of your achievements with the larger HMS community,  click here.

 

Book Reviews
If you are a faculty member who has published a book recently, click here.