In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
January 14, 2015

Midazolam’s ongoing use has alarmed experts because it is relatively untested in execution settings. David Waisel, associate professor of anaesthesia at Boston Children's Hospital, is quoted.

January 14, 2015

Researchers have uncovered a major genetic risk for heart failure — a mutation affecting a key muscle protein that makes the heart less elastic. Christine Seidman, Thomas W. Smith Professor of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and HMS professor of genetics, is a study coauthor.

January 13, 2015

When someone has a cut or a burn, it can be tough to tell if it is healing properly. Even by an experienced eye. But scientists are working on a SMART bandage that can be a “window into a wound.”  Conor Evans, assistant professor of dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital, is leading the research.

January 13, 2015

An experimental new needle-free AIDS vaccine is in the early stages of testing. The vaccine comes in a capsule and is made using a common cold virus called an adenovirus, genetically engineered with a tiny piece of the AIDS virus. Dan Barouch, professor of medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, helped design the vaccine.

January 13, 2015

The Bay State had the fourth-worst rate of hospital readmissions in the nation last year, according to a Kaiser Health News report. Medicare penalized 80 percent of the state’s hospitals for unplanned readmissions, with the average penalty for the 55 hospitals amounting to .78 percent of their Medicare reimbursements, the report states. Karen Joynt, assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is quoted. 

January 13, 2015

A new drug, LCZ696, may mark a significant improvement in heart failure treatments. The drug acts as both an angiotensin receptor blocker and utilizes a neprilysin inhibitor, which limits the hormones that cause blood vessel constriction.  Scott Solomon, professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, is quoted.

January 13, 2015

While most cancer cells multiply quickly, some do not, and it's those "slow proliferators" that may play a key role in a cancer becoming resistant to certain drugs which are designed to kill the fast-growing type. Now, researchers have identified the cause of slowly-dividing cancer cells, paving to way for research into new therapies to target them. Sridhar Ramaswamy, associate professor of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, led the study.

January 13, 2015

A new cancer drug, Opdivo, is working so well that pharmaceutical giant Bristol-Myers Squibb announced Monday it is stopping a trial in lung cancer two years ahead of schedule. Pasi Janne, professor of medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, is quoted.

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