In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
May 1, 2015

Harvard scientists have created a “bionic leaf” that converts solar energy into a liquid fuel. The work—a proof of concept in an exciting new field that might be termed biomanufacturing. Pamela Silver, Elliott T. and Onie H. Adams Professor of Biochemistry and Systems Biology, led the research.

April 23, 2015

The potential of the internal gyroscopes, accelerometers, and GPS sensors in Apple's mobile devices may help patients, doctors, and researchers track the progression of conditions like heart disease, Parkinson’s, and asthma. Stanley Shaw, assistant professor of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted.

April 23, 2015

David King, assistant professor of surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital, participated in an interview about his experiences treating the wounded after running the Boston Marathon in 2013.

April 22, 2015

Rumors of germline modification prove true — and look set to reignite an ethical debate. George Daley, professor of biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology at Children's Hospital Boston, is quoted.

April 21, 2015

Eric Lander, professor of systems biology and director of the Broad Institute of M.I.T. and Harvard, authored this opinion peice about fundamental problems with forensic science in the criminal justice system and how to prevent them.

April 20, 2015

New mammogram screening guidelines from an influential panel of U.S. experts reaffirm earlier guidance that breast cancer screening should begin at age 50 for most women, but they acknowledge that women in their 40s also benefit, something experts say is a step in the right direction. Daniel Kopans, a professor of radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted.

April 20, 2015

Maintaining a daily coffee-and-aspirin routine probably isn’t harmful, but it’s too early to say it will protect anyone from cancer. Andrew Chan, associate professor of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is mentioned.

April 20, 2015

Going to the doctor is an exercise in brisk communication, trust and vulnerability – talking about your health concerns isn’t easy. Add to this crunchtime a new doctor who rushes in, fails to provide an introduction and talks down to you throughout the session. But doctors with bad manners aren’t merely an added frustration while you’re sick: There's evidence they could be hazardous to your health. Helen Riess, associate professor of psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted.

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