Residents as Teachers: Training the Next Generation of Medical Educators

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Residents as Teachers: Training the Next Generation of Medical Educators

Title/Topic:

Residents as Teachers: Training the Next Generation of Medical Educators

 

Presenter(s):

Tracey Cho, MD

Hope Ricciotti, MD

Richard Schwartzstein, MD

Tara Kent, MD

Michael Cahalane, MD

Subha Ramani, MD

Holly Khachadoorian-Elia, MD, MBA

Susan Burgin, DTM&H, MB, BCh

Meredith Atkins, MD

Date/Time:

Thursday, February 14, 2013

2:30 – 5:00 pm

 

Location:

HMS Tosteson Medical Education Center (TMEC) Amphitheater

260 Longwood Avenue

 

Target Audience:

All HMS faculty are invited to attend and eligible to participate.

 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify opportunities for training residents as teachers.
  2. Train residents to incorporate educational strategies into their daily workflow.
  3. Recognize effective methods for assessing residents as teachers.
 

 

 

 

 

 

Symposium Overview

 

2:30 – 2:55 pm

Welcome and Best Practice for a Resident as Teacher curriculum

HMS Academy Director: Richard Schwartzstein, MD
Resident as Teacher Interest Group Chairs: Tracey Cho, MD and Hope Ricciotti, MD

View powerpoint

3:00 – 3:50 pm

Workshop I :

 

Option 1:

TMEC

Tara Kent, MD

Michael Cahalane, MD

 

 

Teaching Procedures Resident as Teacher

 

Précis:

Teaching procedures can be a challenge for house staff and faculty alike.  There are different educational techniques that can be incorporated in order to maintain a learning environment conducive to procedural training while still maintaining patient safety.  We hope to provide those attending our workshop with strategies for training residents to understand the educational principles underlying teaching procedures, and adopt some new teaching methods for training in the teaching of procedures.

 

Learning Objectives:

1. Give examples of the various ways individuals learn procedures

2. Train residents to incorporate civility into the operating room to enhance the learning environment

3. Apply new teaching methods in operating room

 

Option 2:

TMEC

Tracey Cho, MD

Subha Ramani, MD

 

 

Bedside Resident as Teacher

 

Précis:

The bedside provides a unique and essential context for residents to teach and to assess core student competencies, from history taking and examination skills to professionalism, communication, and cultural competency. With increasing documentation requirements, more reliance on imaging technology, shorter length of stays, and eroding clinical skills, however, bedside teaching has given way to hallway and conference room teaching. The bedside setting also poses unique challenges, including performance pressure, incorporating the patient and family into teaching, and time constraints. We aim to provide participants with strategies to increase residents comfort and proficiency at bedside teaching.

 

Learning Objectives:

1. Give examples of barriers to effective bedside teaching by trainees.

2. Describe some strategies to overcome the challenges of bedside teaching efficiently and effectively.

3. Design a program to develop and assess effective bedside teaching skills among trainees.

Designing a Bedside Teaching session for your Resident as Teacher Program

Option 3:

TMEC

Hope Ricciotti, MD

 

 

Resident as Teacher OSTE

 

Précis:

This presentation will introduce faculty to a Resident-as-Teacher objective structured teaching evaluation (OSTE) that has been used for the last five years in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Program at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. The program is instructional as well as evaluative and utilizes immediate faculty feedback as well as a videotaped self-evaluation session. The evaluation tool utilized was created to focus on competencies the residents, students, and faculty educators had previously identified as areas for improvement when teaching in the clinical setting and utilizes a Likert scale (1=poor to 5=excellent) on six teaching skills.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Train residents in the art of asking higher order questions.
  2. Apply a version of the Resident-as-Teacher OSTE to their own residency program.
  3. Use a structured method for assessing residents as teachers. 

OSTE Evaluation Tool

 

3:50 – 3:55 pm

Break

 

3:55 – 4:40 pm

Workshop II :

 

Option 1:

TMEC

Hope Ricciotti, MD

Holly Khachadoorian, MD

 

 

Teaching Residents to Give Effective Large Group Presentations

 

Précis:

Learners typically associate large group learning with lectures.  Though some material does lend itself preferentially to a lecture format, there are different educational techniques that can be incorporated in order to maintain an interactive learning environment while still maintaining the benefits of the large group setting.  We hope to provide those attending our workshop with strategies for training residents to integrate into their large group teaching assignments to enhance their teaching in this format.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify what type of material is best suited to be taught in a large group setting
  2. Train residents to incorporate interactive educational strategies to maximize learning in large groups
  3. Recognize effective communication techniques for facilitating large group learning

 

Option 2:

TMEC

Tracey Cho, MD

Susan Burgin, DTM&H, MB, BCh

 

 

Teaching Residents to Run Small Groups

 

Précis:

Small groups pose unique opportunities and challenges for teachers. For trainees without formal teaching training, managing the dynamics and range of learners without resorting to lecture can be particularly tricky. Education research points to several principles for more effective small group teaching (gauging range of learner background, active listening and observation, open ended vs. directed questions, encouraging learner participation). These principles and skills can be introduced and reinforced through different formats, including synthesis of the educational literature and best practices through reading and lecture, live or video role modeling with deconstruction afterward, and direct observation of real or simulated small group sessions with feedback.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. List the most common pitfalls of small group teaching and several principles that can help overcome those challenges.
  2. Describe formats through which more effective small group teaching practices can be conveyed and reinforced.
  3. Design a curriculum to teach and assess small group teaching skills among trainees. 

 

Option 3:

TMEC

Subha Ramani, MD

Meredith Atkins, MD

 

 

Teaching Residents to Give Effective Feedback

 

Précis:

Feedback in medical education is often inadequate, non-specific and not based on direct observation of clinical performance. While clinical faculty find it challenging residents who supervise and teach medical students find it even more so.  It is imperative that residents at every level acquire these skills. This workshop will discuss strategies for teaching the principles of effective feedback to our residents.

 

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the fundamental principles of effective feedback.
  2. Discuss approaches to designing feedback workshops for resident as teacher programs.
  3. Discuss techniques of assessing residents’ feedback techniques.

View powerpoint from this workshop

Designing a Feedback Didactic for your Resident as Teacher Program

 

 

4:45 – 5:00

Next Steps

 

 

Course Director: Richard Schwartzstein, MD

Course Planners: Tracey Cho, MD and Hope Ricciotti, MD

 

Accreditation

 

The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

 

The Harvard Medical School designates this live activity for a maximum of 2.25 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.