Paper Chase is a research database designed to offer abstracts of research articles published in journals that have a highly rated impact factor as determined by ISI Impact Factor and PageRank. Abstracts are organized by date, with the most recently published papers listed first. 

Paper Chase

Deconstructing the peptide-MHC specificity of T cell recognition.

Cell. May 22, 2014;157(5):1073-87.
Birnbaum ME, Mendoza JL, Sethi DK, Dong S, Glanville J, Dobbins J, Ozkan E, Davis MM, Wucherpfennig KW, Garcia KC.

Departments of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and Structural Biology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Program in Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: kcgarcia@stanford.edu.

Abstract:

In order to survey a universe of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-presented peptide antigens whose numbers greatly exceed the diversity of the T cell repertoire, T cell receptors (TCRs) are thought to be cross-reactive. However, the nature and extent of TCR cross-reactivity has not been conclusively measured experimentally. We developed a system to identify MHC-presented peptide ligands by combining TCR selection of highly diverse yeast-displayed peptide-MHC libraries with deep sequencing. Although we identified hundreds of peptides reactive with each of five different mouse and human TCRs, the selected peptides possessed TCR recognition motifs that bore a close resemblance to their known antigens. This structural conservation of the TCR interaction surface allowed us to exploit deep-sequencing information to computationally identify activating microbial and self-ligands for human autoimmune TCRs. The mechanistic basis of TCR cross-reactivity described here enables effective surveillance of diverse self and foreign antigens without necessitating degenerate recognition of nonhomologous peptides.