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Paper Chase

Glycosylation-dependent lectin-receptor interactions preserve angiogenesis in anti-VEGF refractory tumors.

Cell. Feb 13, 2014;156(4):744-58.
Croci DO, Cerliani JP, Dalotto-Moreno T, Méndez-Huergo SP, Mascanfroni ID, Dergan-Dylon S, Toscano MA, Caramelo JJ, García-Vallejo JJ, Ouyang J, Mesri EA, Junttila MR, Bais C, Shipp MA, Salatino M, Rabinovich GA.

Laboratorio de Inmunopatología, Instituto de Biología y Medicina Experimental (IBYME), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), 1428 Buenos Aires, Argentina; Laboratorio de Glicómica. Departamento de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1428 Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: gabyrabi@gmail.com.

Abstract:

The clinical benefit conferred by vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF)-targeted therapies is variable, and tumors from treated patients eventually reinitiate growth. Here, we identify a glycosylation-dependent pathway that compensates for the absence of cognate ligand and preserves angiogenesis in response to VEGF blockade. Remodeling of the endothelial cell (EC) surface glycome selectively regulated binding of galectin-1 (Gal1), which upon recognition of complex N-glycans on VEGFR2, activated VEGF-like signaling. Vessels within anti-VEGF-sensitive tumors exhibited high levels of α2-6-linked sialic acid, which prevented Gal1 binding. In contrast, anti-VEGF refractory tumors secreted increased Gal1 and their associated vasculature displayed glycosylation patterns that facilitated Gal1-EC interactions. Interruption of β1-6GlcNAc branching in ECs or silencing of tumor-derived Gal1 converted refractory into anti-VEGF-sensitive tumors, whereas elimination of α2-6-linked sialic acid conferred resistance to anti-VEGF. Disruption of the Gal1-N-glycan axis promoted vascular remodeling, immune cell influx and tumor growth inhibition. Thus, targeting glycosylation-dependent lectin-receptor interactions may increase the efficacy of anti-VEGF treatment.