In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
October 9, 2014

Atul Gawande, Samuel O. Their Professor of Surgery at Brigham and Women's Hospital, participated in an interview about heading off the spread of the Ebola virus.Read the full article

October 9, 2014

A growing number of scientists now believe that gut bacteria can influence mental health. Kyle Williams, instructor in psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted.Read the full article

October 9, 2014

A recent study found that poor residents of Arkansas, Kentucky and Texas, when asked to compare Medicaid with private coverage, said that Medicaid offered better “quality of health care” and made them better able to “afford the health care” they needed. Benjamin Sommers, an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hosptial, co-authored the study.Read the full article

October 9, 2014

Researchers are harnessing a powerful arsenal of biomedical tools to unlock the secrets of individual “exceptional responders.” Nikhil Wagle, instructor in medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, led the research. Lecia Sequist, associate professor of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted. Jochen Lorch, assistant professor of medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, is mentioned.Read the full article

October 8, 2014

A visit to the doctor later in the day makes it more likely that a patient will walk away with a prescription antibiotic, according to a new report. Jeffrey Linder, associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, led the study. Read the full article

October 8, 2014

Multiple sclerosis researchers are focusing on the content of the gut’s microbiome as a possible contributor to the body’s autoimmune attack on its nervous system. Sushrut Jangi, instructor in medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, co-authored the study.Read the full article

October 8, 2014

Claire McCarthy, assistant professor of pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital, authored this blog post about fighting Ebola.Read the full article

October 8, 2014

A new variation of a therapy used to treat X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome uses a genetically engineered virus to help the body create disease-fighting T-cells. David A. Williams, Leland Fikes Professor of Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital, coauthored the study.

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