In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
May 1, 2015

As researchers conduct the most rigorous human trials of cardiac cell therapies yet attempted, a clear picture of whether these treatments actually work is imminent. Richard Lee, professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, is quoted.

May 1, 2015

A combination of three HIV drugs does a remarkably good job fighting Ebola in the laboratory, according to new research. . Eric Campbell, professor of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted.

May 1, 2015

In recent years, vitamin D has gained a reputation for being a miracle nutrient of sorts— boasting benefits from improving physical and mental wellbeing. But as more research emerges, just how vast the vitamin’s value is has become the subject of scientific debate. JoAnn Manson, Michael and Lee Bell Professor of Women's Health at Brigham and Women's Hospital, is quoted.

May 1, 2015

Congress has over the past few decades passed a series of special approval pathways for important drugs that treat life-threatening or rare diseases. This week, a new bill introduced in the House could add two more. Aaron Kesselheim, associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, is quoted.

May 1, 2015

Researchers are finding clues about the metabolism in human urine – most recently in more than 2,000 samples kept frozen in the basement of Imperial College, in London. Robert Gerszten, professor of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, is quoted.

May 1, 2015

Harvard scientists have created a “bionic leaf” that converts solar energy into a liquid fuel. The work—a proof of concept in an exciting new field that might be termed biomanufacturing. Pamela Silver, Elliott T. and Onie H. Adams Professor of Biochemistry and Systems Biology, led the research.

May 1, 2015

Imagine what it must have been like to look through the first telescopes or the first microscopes, or to see the bottom of the sea as clearly as if the water were gin. This is how students of human prehistory are starting to feel, thanks to a new ability to study ancient DNA extracted from bodies and bones in archaeological sites. David Reich, professor of genetics, is mentioned.

April 30, 2015

The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved an injection for the reduction of moderate to severe fat deposits under the chin. The active ingredient, deoxycholic acid, dissolves fat, permitting dermatologists and plastic surgeons to resculpt the chin area without surgery. Lynn Drake, lecturer on dermatology at Massachusetts General Hospital, is mentioned.

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