In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
March 7, 2015

The Food and Drug Administration yesterday approved its first “biosimilar” drug — a lower-cost version of an expensive, complex medication — which could boost market competition and lead to billions of dollars in savings for insurers and patients. Aaron Kesselheim, associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, is quoted. 

March 6, 2015

New research suggests that a short nap not only feels nice, but it can reduce stress and help your body fight off illness, recover from sleep deprivation, and function better. Jeanne Duffy, associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is quoted. 

March 6, 2015

Harvard Medical School held a symposium on Ebola that drew several hundred attendees for presentations about efforts to develop vaccines and therapeutics. Jeffrey S. Flier, dean of the faculty of medicine at Harvard University and Caroline Shields Walker Professor of Medicine; John Mekalanos, head of the Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology and Adele Lehman Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; and Paul Farmer, Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine and head of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, are mentioned.

March 6, 2015

Steven Schlozman, assistant professor of psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, authored this blog post about curtailing the national obsession with firearms.

March 5, 2015

How easy would it be to edit a human embryo using CRISPR? Very easy, experts say. Luhan Yang, research fellow in genetics, and David Sinclair, professor of genetics, are quoted. George Church, Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, is mentioned.

March 5, 2015

A study released Thursday found that 25 healthy men who got a dose of aerosolized oxytocin and then offered a man-sized serving of breakfast consumed fewer calories, decreased their fat intake, and showed improved measures of metabolic function such as insulin sensitivity. Elizabeth Lawson, assistant professor of medicine, led the study. 

March 5, 2015

Gout, the most common type of inflammatory arthritis, affects an estimated 8.3 million Americans. People with the condition suffer from intense joint pain and a limited range of motion, but new research suggests a surprising benefit of the diagnosis: protection against Alzheimer’s disease. Hyon Choi, professor of medicine professor at Massachusetts General Hospital, led the research. 

March 5, 2015

A pilot program to put certified nursing assistants in leadership positions is helping to move Hebrew SeniorLife’s nursing-home culture away from an institutional feel to a model where residents get more choice and freedom in their day-to-day activities. 

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