In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
November 7, 2014

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) affects about one in 10 Americans each winter, according to a study by the National Institutes of Health. One treatment for SAD involves increasing your light exposure — but it can be difficult to tell how much you’re getting each day. Jacqueline Olds, associate clinical professor of psychiatry, and Richard Schwartz, associate clinical professor of psychiatry, helped deveolp a light-tracking device for consumers.

November 6, 2014

Modern Europeans have genetic ties that bind them together much further back in time than once thought, scientists report after analyzing a prehistoric Russian man's DNA. Pontus Skoglund, research fellow in genetics, is quoted.

November 6, 2014

Dennis Rosen, assistant professor of pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, authored this feature about the importance of incorporating cultural and religious beliefs into treatment plans whenever possible.

November 5, 2014

Continued coverage of the faculty discourse regarding changes in Harvard University health benefits.Read the full article

November 5, 2014

Researchers may have figured out why different species develop different kinds of genitalia. In snakes and reptiles, the genitals grow to mimic leg buds—producing twin organs. In humans, the genitals grow to mimic a tail bud—so the penis ends up as a single structure. Clifford Tabin, George Jacob and Jacqueline Hazel Leder Professor of Genetics and head of the Department of Genetics, led the research. Patrick Tschopp, research fellow in genetics, is the study's first author.

November 5, 2014

Changing how doctors communicate during shift changes in hospitals reduced the risk of adverse events in patients by 30 percent, a new study found. Amy Starmer, lecturer on pediatrics at Boston Children's Hospital, led the research.

November 5, 2014

Researchers have determined that the genitalia of mammals and reptiles develop from two different tissues, but the structures share common genetic programs and molecular induction signals. Clifford Tabin, George Jacob and Jacqueline Hazel Leder Professor of Genetics and head of the Department of Genetics, led the research. Patrick Tschopp, research fellow in genetics, is the study's first author.

November 5, 2014

More than 2 million men suffer from osteoporosis, but health care workers and patients perceive the ailment as a disease that primarily affects women. A new study suggests that this perception may contribute to a widespread failure to test and treat men for osteoporosis, a disease that weakens bones and increases the likelihood of fractures. Tamara Rozental, associate professor of orthopedic surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, led the research.

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