In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
October 3, 2012

Boston-area teaching hospitals and universities are bracing for deep cuts in the federal funding that has fueled biomedical research for decades, raising fears that breakthrough work on cancer cures, stem cells, gene therapy, and other research will suffer setbacks. Bill Chin, executive dean for research; Lee Nadler, dean for clinical and translational research; Peter L. Slavin, president of Massachusetts General Hospital; Stirling Churchman, HMS assistant professor of genetics; and David Scadden, professor of stem cell and regenerative biology, are quoted.

October 3, 2012

James Perrin, HMS professor of pediatrics at the MassGeneral Hospital for Children, will become president of the American Academy of Pediatrics for a one-year term in 2014.

October 2, 2012

New research suggests that beta-blocker pills don't prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiac deaths in patients with heart disease, but doctors are torn over whether there's enough in the study to make them want to stop prescribing the drugs. Christopher Cannon, HMS professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is a coauthor.

October 2, 2012

Taking vitamin D supplements does nothing to prevent colds or other forms of upper respiratory tract infections, according to a new study. Jeffrey Linder, HMS associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, wrote an editorial accompanying the study.

October 2, 2012

For reasons doctors don't completely understand, a woman's risk of breast cancer actually goes up in the five years or so after she has a child, called postpartum breast cancer, and doctors are increasingly trying to understand why this occurs. Eric Winer, HMS professor of medicine at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, is quoted.

October 2, 2012

George Church, the Robert Winthrop Professor of Genetics, participated in a Q&A about “Regenesis,” his new book about synthetic biology that he encoded into chunks of DNA.

October 1, 2012

Lewis Lipsitz, HMS professor of medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Hebrew SeniorLife, addresses the question about the causes of fainting.

October 1, 2012

You don’t have to be elderly, or even very old, to develop delirium, a kind of brain attack often accompanied by hallucinations, agitation and disorientation that can exacerbate illness, increase medical costs and even hasten death. Tamara Fong, HMS assistant professor of neurology at Hebrew SeniorLife, is quoted.

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