In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
October 30, 2013

According to a new study conducted at HMS, structured exercise programs may be as effective, or even more useful, than medication to treat cardiovascular conditions. Huseyin Naci, visiting fellow in population medicine at HMS, is the lead author.

October 30, 2013

Providing early antiretroviral drug treatment for recently infected HIV patients and their uninfected sexual partners is a cost-effective way to help patients stay healthy and prevent transmission of HIV, a new study finds. Rochelle Walensky and Kenneth Freedberg, both HMS professors of medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, led the study.

October 29, 2013

Doctors might better predict a woman's risk for breast cancer by tracking levels of key hormones, Harvard researchers report. Shelley Tworoger, HMS associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is the lead author of the study.

October 29, 2013

Performing a prostate-specific antigen, or PSA test for prostate cancer screening in men with no symptoms of the disease when they are expected to live less than 10 years is on the new “Top Five” list of things not to do, released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Lowell Schnipper, the Theodore W. and Evelyn G. Berenson Professor of Medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, is the lead author of the article.

October 28, 2013

Doctors often don't test for it, and patients may have no symptoms until they are in crisis. Yet kidney disease is fast becoming a dangerous health threat, and one of the most costly, in the U.S. Robert Stanton, HMS associate professor of medicine at Joslin Diabetes Center, is quoted.

October 28, 2013

Poverty and lack of nurturing in early life may have a direct effect on a child’s brain development, according to a study that found smaller brain volumes in poor, neglected children. Charles Nelson, HMS professor of pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital, wrote an accompanying editorial in the journal.

October 27, 2013

We spend so much time asleep, there must be an important reason for it -- or so the thinking goes. Sleep lies somewhere between bodily function and behavior -- we need it, we can't function without it, and yet we have some control over the circumstances in which it happens. Research conducted at HMS is cited.

October 27, 2013

Edward Kravitz, the George Packer Berry Professor of Neurobiology at HMS, was recently a guest on the Science Studio radio program to discuss his research on aggression in fruit flies.

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