In the News

Recent Coverage of HMS in the News
October 2, 2012

New research suggests that beta-blocker pills don't prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiac deaths in patients with heart disease, but doctors are torn over whether there's enough in the study to make them want to stop prescribing the drugs. Christopher Cannon, HMS professor of medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, is a coauthor.

October 2, 2012

Taking vitamin D supplements does nothing to prevent colds or other forms of upper respiratory tract infections, according to a new study. Jeffrey Linder, HMS associate professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, wrote an editorial accompanying the study.

October 1, 2012

Partners In Health celebrates its 25th anniversary this week and looks back at all the organization has accomplished and what lies ahead in the coming years, including the opening of the Mirebalais National Teaching Hospital in Haiti. Paul Farmer, Kolokotrones University Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, is one of the cofounders of Partners In Health.

October 1, 2012

Extending treatment with Roche's breast cancer drug Herceptin to two years from the one year current standard is not worth while, trial data showed on Monday, but shortening treatment to six months also looks unlikely to benefit patients. Richard Gelber, HMS professor of pediatrics, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, led the trial.

October 1, 2012

On any given day, children in the U.S. are exposed to nearly four hours of background TV -- a finding that experts say may take a toll on children's development. Michael Rich, HMS associate professor of pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital, is quoted.

October 1, 2012

Ben Warf, HMS associate professor of surgery at Boston Children’s Hospital, has been named a 2012 MacArthur Foundation Fellow, one of four Boston-area recipients of the “genius grant.”

October 1, 2012

Lewis Lipsitz, HMS professor of medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Hebrew SeniorLife, addresses the question about the causes of fainting.

October 1, 2012

You don’t have to be elderly, or even very old, to develop delirium, a kind of brain attack often accompanied by hallucinations, agitation and disorientation that can exacerbate illness, increase medical costs and even hasten death. Tamara Fong, HMS assistant professor of neurology at Hebrew SeniorLife, is quoted.

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