Past Events 2011-2012

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Past Events 2011-2012

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 - 2 to 5 pm
Strategies to Improve Small Group Teaching
In 2010, the Taskforce on Classroom Learning reaffirmed the goals of small group learning at Harvard Medical School: to reinforce knowledge through problem solving, to plumb the depths of a problem, to test assumptions, generate hypotheses and practice reasoning critically, to collaborate with peers, and to receive feedback and reflect in action.  To foster teaching to meet these goals, the Academy Center for Teaching and Learning will offer an afternoon series of related workshops.  Using a standard observation guide, participants will observe videotaped small group discussions and then propose strategies to improve facilitating group dynamics; fostering curiosity and critical thinking; and teaching basic concepts. This event is strongly recommended for all Fundamentals of Medicine tutors and all Years I-III small group facilitators.
Click here for more information
 

Friday, September 16, 2011 - 7:30 to 9 am
Medical Education Grand Rounds: How Neurologists Think: What My Errors Taught Me
Martin Samuels, MD
Dr. Samuels will use real case histories to help the learner recognize the source for some of the common types of cognitive errors that occur in diagnosis.  This is done by presenting the patients' histories, encouraging participation from the audience and then analyzing the heuristic (rule of thumb) that was used in making the error. 
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Download podcast of this event

Monday, September 19, 2011 - 4 to 5:30 pm - TMEC 250
Introduction to Tutorial for Prospective Tutors
Sam Kennedy, PhD
This is a small group informational session for faculty interested in the tutorial format in HMS courses.  This session will introduce the basis of tutorial based learning and present strategies for success, specific to the Harvard Medical School use of that format.  While providing a highlights presentation of information, this session will also allow opportunities for questions of interest or concern from the participants. References for how to become involved in tutoring at HMS will be provided.

Friday, October 7, 2011 - 7:30 to 9 am - TMEC 250
Medical Education Grand Rounds: Interdisciplinary Science in the Freshman Year at Harvard
Robert Lue, PhD
We have just completed the fifth year of an interdisciplinary curriculum that integrates biology and chemistry for Harvard freshmen. This integrated foundation replaced the traditional freshman courses in biology and chemistry, and now serves the needs of science concentrators, students with pre-medical aspirations, and general education students.  We will discuss the history of the new curriculum as well as current assessments of how well it works.

Friday, October 14, 2011 - 1:30 to 5 pm - Leventhal Conference Room, BIDMC
BIDMC Retreat - Developing Your Career as a Clinician Educator
Co-sponsored by: HMS Academy, BIDMC Academy, BIDMC Office of Academic Careers, and BIDMC Office of Professional Development

Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 12 to 5:30 pm - TMEC Atrium and Amphitheatre
Medical Education Day
Teaching Critical Thinking Skills: From Theory to Practice
Click here for more information

Interhospital Collaborative: Starting with Stories: The Hidden Curriculum at HMS
BIDMC / Cambridge Hospital
Wednesday, November 16, 2011
Drs. Gaufberg and Bell will present the results of their collaborative research using medical student narrative reflections to understand and engage with the hidden curriculum at HMS.   They will also review pilot data from an interactive online curriculum focusing on "micro-ethical challenges" encountered by students in the hidden curriculum, and facilitate a discussion on approaches to positively impact medical culture at HMS and affiliates hospitals.
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Medical Education Grand Rounds: Explicit reasoning: teaching students the science and art of the diagnostic process
Friday, November 18, 2011
Richard Kopelman, MD & Joseph Rencic, MD
The aims of this session are to: 1) Provide an overview of the cognitive psychology and expertise literature on clinical reasoning, 2) Discuss tips for teaching clinical reasoning derived from the above literature, and 3)Present a novel curriculum in teaching clinical reasoning to second year medical students at Tufts University School of Medicine.
Click here for a reference list for the handouts
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Medical Education Grand Rounds: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Medical Education, and the Spirit of Skepticism
Friday, December 2, 2011 - 7:30 to 9 am
Scott Harris Podolsky, MD
Oliver Wendell Holmes spent large parts of the nineteenth century as America's best-known physician and one of its best-selling authors, famous for both his therapeutic skepticism and literary iconoclasm.  He was also dean of Harvard Medical School during a brief but tumultuous period of its development, and HMS' most beloved lecturer for many more decades.  Dr. Podolsky will discuss the fundamental skepticism that imbued Dr. Holmes' entwined medical, literary, and philosophical pursuits, and their impact upon medical education and medical thinking at HMS and beyond, both during and after his lifetime.
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Wednesday, December 7, 2011 – 4 to 5:30 pm - TMEC 447
Microtutoring I: Managing Problem Tutorials (The Quiet Student & The Domineering Student)
Toni Peters, PhD
This workshop is offered as a follow up to the Academy’s mini-symposium on small group facilitation and Medical Education Day workshops on critical thinking. In the workshop, participants rotate roles, each having an opportunity to tutor a group problem or to be a student within the problem group. The group debriefs each scenario and collectively generates strategies to manage such groups effectively. Goals of this session include: practicing tutoring a group when a student is quiet or domineering, identifying strategies to improve group dynamics, and serving as a peer coach to provide feedback to fellow tutors.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012 - 4 to 5:30 pm
Medical Education Grand Rounds: Critical Thinking: Use of Mechanism Maps to Enhance Learning in Medical Students
Richard Schwartzstein, MD
Medical students typically perceive their education as an impossible demand to memorize a mountain of facts. The Taskforce on Classroom Learning at Harvard Medical School made recommendations one year ago to refocus our teaching efforts on conceptual understanding and critical thinking. This session will explore some of the neurobiological and cognitive theories underlying the concepts of elaborated knowledge, deep learning, and critical thinking. We will also examine data acquired in a study of the use of “mechanism maps” as a strategy to enhance learning in a pre-clinical course at Harvard Medical School.
View streaming video of this event

Tuesday, February 7, 2012 - 4 to 5:30 pm
Introduction to Tutorial for Prospective Tutors
Sam Kennedy, PhD
This is a small group informational session for faculty interested in the tutorial format in HMS courses.  This session will introduce the basis of tutorial based learning and present strategies for success, specific to the Harvard Medical School use of that format.  While providing a highlights presentation of information, this session will also allow opportunities for questions of interest or concern from the participants. References for how to become involved in tutoring at HMS will be provided.

Wednesday, February 15, 2012 - 4 to 6 pm
Inter-hospital Collaborative: Children's Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital
1) Elizabeth Doherty, MD -"Implementation of 360-Degree Assessment for Harvard Neonatal-Perinatal Fellows" (CHB)
2) Brigid Dolan, MD - "A Spaced Education Curriculum to Improve Bone Health Care by Internal Medicine Residents" (BWH)
3) Stuart Goldman, MD - "Promoting Adult Learning : The Educational Kanban" CHB
View streaming video of this event

Tuesday, February 28, 2012 - 2 to 5 pm
Educational Technology Symposium: Working With New Tools for Teaching and Learning
The array of technology available to faculty and students as part of their teaching/learning is expanding. Smartboards, iPads, smartphones, tablet PCs, video conferencing, and online collaboration tools are just a few of the many choices. This symposium includes hands on workshops that give opportunities to learn about and experiment with educational technology. In addition, students are often ahead of the faculty in terms of using technology, and students will show examples of how they are using technology in novel ways to enhance their learning.
Click here for more information
Click here to view streaming video

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 & Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 2 to 5 pm
Educational Research Methods Course
Amy Sullivan, EdD; Ed Krupat, PhD; Eric Campbell, PhD; Toni Peters, PhD; Grace Huang, MD; Deb Weinstein, MD; Elizabeth Hohmann, MD; Carolyn Connelly, PhD; Emma Eggleston, MD; Beth Lown, MD; Amy Cohen, Steve Pelletier, PhD
Effective educational practices and policies depend on evidence produced by sound educational, social, and behavioral research methods. The HMS Academy 2012 Medical Education Research Workshop will be held in two half-day sessions, on February 29th and March 15th, from 2:00-5:15 pm. These sessions will provide introductory and intermediate level workshops for applying social science research methods to educational issues in medicine and health care. We will cover basic design issues, survey development and validation, qualitative methods including how to conduct focus groups, and some basic analytic approaches including statistical tests for survey data and content analysis for qualitative data. Faculty will also be available for small group working sessions to help participants make progress on their individual projects.
Click here for more information

Friday, March 2, 2012 - 7:30 to 9 am
Medical Education Grand Rounds: How the Social Brain Processes Positive and Negative Feedback or "Why don't students take our feedback and improve?"
Toni Peters, PhD
Feedback is information about one's performance received from an external source. We assume that such information will motivate learners to improve their performance. Not always! Here, we'll consider how individuals respond to positive and negative feedback delivered directly by another person – i.e., in a social context. Specifically, we'll examine from both psychological and neuro-physiological perspectives (a) possible outcomes of feedback (improvement in performance, decline in performance, no change in performance); (b) relative effectiveness of positive versus negative feedback; and (c) effectiveness of the feedback sandwich (positive and negative). Last, we'll consider implications for ourselves as life-long learners and as teachers.
Click here to view streaming video

Wednesday, March 14, 2012 - 2 to 5 pm - TMEC 250
Strategies to Improve Small Group Teaching
In 2010, the Taskforce on Classroom Learning reaffirmed the goals of small group learning at Harvard Medical School: to reinforce knowledge through problem solving, to plumb the depths of a problem, to test assumptions, generate hypotheses and practice reasoning critically, to collaborate with peers, and to receive feedback and reflect in action.  To foster teaching to meet these goals, the Academy Center for Teaching and Learning will offer an afternoon series of related workshops.  Using a standard observation guide, participants will observe videotaped small group discussions and then propose strategies to improve facilitating group dynamics; fostering curiosity and critical thinking; and teaching basic concepts. This event is strongly recommended for all Fundamentals of Medicine tutors and all Years I-III small group facilitators.
Click here for more information

Thursday, March 15, 2012 - 2 to 5 pm - TMEC 209
Educational Research Methods Course
Amy Sullivan, EdD; Ed Krupat, PhD; Eric Campbell, PhD; Toni Peters, PhD; Grace Huang, MD; Deb Weinstein, MD; Elizabeth Hohmann, MD; Carolyn Connelly, PhD; Emma Eggleston, MD; Beth Lown, MD; Amy Cohen, Steve Pelletier, PhD
Effective educational practices and policies depend on evidence produced by sound educational, social, and behavioral research methods. The HMS Academy 2012 Medical Education Research Workshop will be held in two half-day sessions, on February 29th and March 15th, from 2:00-5:15 pm.  These sessions will provide introductory and intermediate level workshops for applying social science research methods to educational issues in medicine and health care.  We will cover basic design issues, survey development and validation, qualitative methods including how to conduct focus groups, and some basic analytic approaches including statistical tests for survey data and content analysis for qualitative data.  Faculty will also be available for small group working sessions to help participants make progress on their individual projects.
Click here for more information

Wednesday, March 28, 2012 - 4 to 6 pm - TMEC 250
Inter-hospital Collaborative: Brigham & Women's Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital
1. Nora Osman, M.D. and Erik Alexander, M.D.: "Variation and Imprecision in Clerkship Grading across the United States" (BWH)
2. Cindy Cooper, M.D.: "Have It Your Way: Teaching Students To Customize Their Feedback Sandwich" (MGH)
3. Lawrence Tsen, M.D., Jonathan F. Borus, M.D., Carol C. Nadelson, M.D., Ellen W. Seely, M.D., Audrey Haas, M.B.A., Anne L. Fuhlbrigge, M.D., M.S.: "The Development, Implementation, and Assessment of an Innovative Mentoring Leadership Program for Faculty Mentors" (BWH)

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 4 to 5:30 pm  - TMEC 250
Medical Education Grand Rounds: Health Care and the Supreme Court
Gregory Curfman, MD, Executive Editor, New England Journal of Medicine
In March of 2012,  the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. The Court's opinion in this landmark case, which will be announced early this summer, will have sweeping implications for the future of health care in our country and for the authority of the federal government to regulate health care. In this session, we will take a look at the constitutional questions the Court will address. Following the presentation, there will be a panel on the implications for both undergraduate and graduate medical education.
Click here to watch streaming video

Friday, April 6, 2012 - 8 to 9 am - TMEC Amphitheatre
Academy Membership Meeting
View streaming video
 

Friday, April 6, 2012 - 9 to 12 noon - Armenise Amphitheatre
Annual Symposium on the Science of Learning: Memory and Judgment: Implications for Teaching Medical Students and Residents
Joshua Greene, PhD, Harvard University and John Gabrieli, PhD, MITThe goal of the Symposium on The Science of Learning is to explore research in the cognitive and neurosciences for implications for teaching and learning in medicine. This year’s symposium features work on memory and moral judgment, respectively, by two renowned researchers, Drs. John Gabrieli and Joshua Greene. The nature of learning, memory and judgment changes over the lifespan and with context and content. Thus, we seek an understanding of the nuances of memory and how medical students and residents access past learning to make clinical, professional and ethical decisions.
Click here to view part one
Click here to view part two

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 – 4 to 5:30 pm - TMEC 333
Microtutoring I: Managing Problem Tutorials (The Quiet Student & The Domineering Student)
Toni Peters, PhD
This workshop is offered as a follow up to the Academy’s mini-symposium on small group facilitation and Medical Education Day workshops on critical thinking. In the workshop, participants rotate roles, each having an opportunity to tutor a group problem or to be a student within the problem group. The group debriefs each scenario and collectively generates strategies to manage such groups effectively. Goals of this session include: practicing tutoring a group when a student is quiet or domineering, identifying strategies to improve group dynamics, and serving as a peer coach to provide feedback to fellow tutors.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012 – 4 to 5:30 pm - TMEC 333
Microtutoring II: Managing Problem Tutorials (The Unprepared Group & The Unscientific Discussion)
Toni Peters, PhD
This workshop is offered as a follow up to the Academy’s mini-symposium on small group facilitation and Medical Education Day workshops on critical thinking. In the workshop, participants rotate roles, each having an opportunity to tutor a group problem or to be a student within the problem group. The group debriefs each scenario and collectively generates strategies to manage such groups effectively. Goals of this session include: practicing tutoring a group when a student is quiet or domineering, identifying strategies to improve group dynamics, and serving as a peer coach to provide feedback to fellow tutors.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012 - 4 to 6 pm - TMEC 250
Inter-hospital Collaborative: Massachusetts General Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

  • Integration of Simulation into Third Year Clerkship - Marc DeMoya, MD - MGH
  • Education about Professional Accountability: Where Health Care Reform and Medical Education Roads Cross in Our Own Backyard - Jeffrey Greenwald, MD - MGH   
  • There is no “I” in Team: Using Inter-Professional Education Strategies to Improve Provider Collaboration - Wendy Stead, MD - BIDMC

View streaming video of this event

Thursday, May 3, 2012 - 12:30 to 4:30 pm - TMEC Amph
Writing for Scholarship: Pathways to Publications, Prestige, and Promotion
Jeffrey Drazen, MD, Editor of NEJM and Jerome Groopman, MD
This symposium will focus on concrete strategies for producing scholarly publications which will assist in the promotion process at HMS.
Click here for more information           
View streaming video of the keynote
View streaming video of the plenary

Friday, May 4, 2012 - 7:30 to 9 am - TMEC 250
Medical Education Grand Rounds: Revisiting the role of knowledge in expert development and practice
Maria Mylopoulos, PhD, University of Toronto
Excellence in the education and training of future experts is crucial to the success of all professions. Extensive efforts have therefore been made to explore expertise, with the aim of translating understanding of expert performance into more effective expert development. However, our understanding of what it means to perform at the highest levels of a profession and the particular competencies that we value as the core of excellence have proven to be dynamic and often controversial issues.  In the expertise literature, over the last half-century, the accrual and organization of an extensive knowledge base has become widely recognized by educators and researchers as the foundation for expertise and expert performance. The dominance of the view of acquired knowledge as the foundation for expertise is mirrored in the many competency frameworks that foreground the application of clinical knowledge, skills and procedures even as they seek to be inclusive of additional competencies.  Moreover, while additional competencies associated with ‘elite’ physician practice are gaining traction in the medical community, peer nomination data still shows that the primary basis for nominating ‘outstanding practitioners’ remains their perceived extensive knowledge base . However, as our understanding of expertise has expanded to include previously unexplored facets of expert performance, the particular role of knowledge in expert development and practice is being increasingly revisited.  In particular, the ability of practitioners to not only apply their repertoire of knowledge to problems they face, but to also deal with novel, emergent or unexpected problems of practice effectively and use these experiences as the basis for a process of continual improvement is not adequately accounted for by models of expertise that conceptualize problem solving as the application of an acquired database of knowledge. This presentation will critically explore various cognitive constructions of expertise, with a particular focus on the differing ways in which the role of accrued knowledge has been conceptualized in models of expert development and practice.    
View streaming video of this event

Wednesday, May 23, 2012 - 4 to 6 pm - TMEC 250
Inter-hospital Collaborative: Mt Auburn Hospital/Cambridge Health Alliance and Children's Hospital

  • Communicating with families of patients who are critically ill - Saira Samani, MD and Beth Lown, MD
  • Benefits and challenges of a longitudinal/integrated clerkship in Radiology (a work-in-progress) - Arthur Chang, MD 
  • Appraising how HMSII students write about cases - Alan Woolf, MD, MPH

Friday, June 1, 2012 - 7:30 to 9 am - TMEC 250
Medical Education Grand Rounds: Reflections of a Clinical Teacher
Daniel Federman, MD
Carl W. Walter Distinguished Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
View streaming video of this event

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